BEER WASTE

BEER WASTE

BEER WASTE

Today, an estimated one-third of all the food produced in the world goes to waste, which equals to about 1.3 billion tons of waste and 11% of all the greenhouse gas emissions. In the UK, the production of food and drink uses significant quantities of resources and its impacts include 170Mt of CO2 emissions (21% of UK's territorial emissions) and the consumption of around 70 billion m3 of water or roughly 70% of the UK‟s water footprint.

Waste outputs from breweries are large in bulk and high in moisture. A typical small brewery brewing 3000 litres three times a week will have around two tons of spent grain to dispose of every week. A larger brewery may have up to 4 tons per day to remove and a large regional brewery could easily generate ten times this amount. Historically, the major avenue for disposal has been to agricultural use, either as animal feed or as a soil improver and for breweries located near to farms this has been an easy option. However, reductions in dairy farming, restrictions on farm movements due to disease and legislation have limited this avenue. Additionally, when we take into account the fact that many breweries are in cities, nowhere near to a free agricultural disposal source, it becomes evident that there is a pressing need for broader options for disposal.

Luna:lab works with three main waste streams from the brewing process: spent grain, sediment and hops.

beer waste Sediment light

SEDIMENT / TRUB

noun [ sed-uh-muh nt ]
1. the matter that settles to the bottom of a liquid; lees; dregs.

Trub, from the German word meaning “sediment,” is a collective term covering sediments formed in the brewing process during wort boiling and upon cooling the wort before primary fermentation boiling as well as during cold storage of fermented beer, which is called cold trub. These three types of sediments are collectively called “trub” because they mainly consist of the same type of chemical complexes formed by the reaction between the naturally occurring polyphenols in the wort and parts of the soluble protein. The colour of the trub depends on the beer brewed - normally ranging from pale yellow to dark brown which depends on the ingredients used.

Trub, regardless of whether it is warm or cold, is a waste product that is often discarded by being poured down the drains which pollutes the waters and impacts ecosystems. The high organic nature of brewery wastewater causes oxygen in surface water to be depleted at a rapid rate, which negatively impacts living species and biodiversity.

SEDIMENT / TRUB

noun [ sed-uh-muh nt ]
1. the matter that settles to the bottom of a liquid; lees; dregs.

Trub, from the German word meaning “sediment,” is a collective term covering sediments formed in the brewing process during wort boiling and upon cooling the wort before primary fermentation boiling as well as during cold storage of fermented beer, which is called cold trub. These three types of sediments are collectively called “trub” because they mainly consist of the same type of chemical complexes formed by the reaction between the naturally occurring polyphenols in the wort and parts of the soluble protein. The colour of the trub depends on the beer brewed - normally ranging from pale yellow to dark brown which depends on the ingredients used.

Trub, regardless of whether it is warm or cold, is a waste product that is often discarded by being poured down the drains which pollutes the waters and impacts ecosystems. The high organic nature of brewery wastewater causes oxygen in surface water to be depleted at a rapid rate, which negatively impacts living species and biodiversity.

SEDIMENT / TRUB

noun [ sed-uh-muh nt ]
1. the matter that settles to the bottom of a liquid; lees; dregs.

Trub, from the German word meaning “sediment,” is a collective term covering sediments formed in the brewing process during wort boiling and upon cooling the wort before primary fermentation boiling as well as during cold storage of fermented beer, which is called cold trub. These three types of sediments are collectively called “trub” because they mainly consist of the same type of chemical complexes formed by the reaction between the naturally occurring polyphenols in the wort and parts of the soluble protein. The colour of the trub depends on the beer brewed - normally ranging from pale yellow to dark brown which depends on the ingredients used.

Trub, regardless of whether it is warm or cold, is a waste product that is often discarded by being poured down the drains which pollutes the waters and impacts ecosystems. The high organic nature of brewery wastewater causes oxygen in surface water to be depleted at a rapid rate, which negatively impacts living species and biodiversity.

SEDIMENT / TRUB

noun [ sed-uh-muh nt ]
1. the matter that settles to the bottom of a liquid; lees; dregs.

Trub, from the German word meaning “sediment,” is a collective term covering sediments formed in the brewing process during wort boiling and upon cooling the wort before primary fermentation boiling as well as during cold storage of fermented beer, which is called cold trub. These three types of sediments are collectively called “trub” because they mainly consist of the same type of chemical complexes formed by the reaction between the naturally occurring polyphenols in the wort and parts of the soluble protein. The colour of the trub depends on the beer brewed - normally ranging from pale yellow to dark brown which depends on the ingredients used.

Trub, regardless of whether it is warm or cold, is a waste product that is often discarded by being poured down the drains which pollutes the waters and impacts ecosystems. The high organic nature of brewery wastewater causes oxygen in surface water to be depleted at a rapid rate, which negatively impacts living species and biodiversity.

spentgrain

SPENT GRAIN

Spent, verb [ spent ]
1. used up; consumed.

Grain, noun [ greyn ]
1. a small, hard seed, especially the seed of a food plant such as wheat, corn, rye, oats, rice, or millet.

About 85% of brewery waste is spent grain, which is generated during the mashing process and is removed from the brewing process from the mash / lauter tun or mash filter before the boiling step of brewing occurs. Global production of this averages about 42 million tonnes each year, much of which will end up in landfill or used in a resource recovery facility to create energy, a small amount is used as animal feedstock.

Spent brewers’ grains are high in protein (more than 20%) and fibre with their colours ranging from yellow to black. The waste grains change in their shape and form depending on the specific type of malt used as well as the brewing process.

SPENT GRAIN

Spent, verb [ spent ]
1. used up; consumed.

Grain, noun [ greyn ]
1. a small, hard seed, especially the seed of a food plant such as wheat, corn, rye, oats, rice, or millet.

About 85% of brewery waste is spent grain, which is generated during the mashing process and is removed from the brewing process from the mash / lauter tun or mash filter before the boiling step of brewing occurs. Global production of this averages about 42 million tonnes each year, much of which will end up in landfill or used in a resource recovery facility to create energy, a small amount is used as animal feedstock.

Spent brewers’ grains are high in protein (more than 20%) and fibre with their colours ranging from yellow to black. The waste grains change in their shape and form depending on the specific type of malt used as well as the brewing process.

SPENT GRAIN

Spent, verb [ spent ]
1. used up; consumed.

Grain, noun [ greyn ]
1. a small, hard seed, especially the seed of a food plant such as wheat, corn, rye, oats, rice, or millet.

About 85% of brewery waste is spent grain, which is generated during the mashing process and is removed from the brewing process from the mash / lauter tun or mash filter before the boiling step of brewing occurs. Global production of this averages about 42 million tonnes each year, much of which will end up in landfill or used in a resource recovery facility to create energy, a small amount is used as animal feedstock.

Spent brewers’ grains are high in protein (more than 20%) and fibre with their colours ranging from yellow to black. The waste grains change in their shape and form depending on the specific type of malt used as well as the brewing process.

hops

SPENT HOPS

Spent, verb [ spent ]
1. used up; consumed.

Hops or Humulus Lupulus 
1. a species of flowering plant in the hemp family 

Hop flower is the plant part used in brewing beer, a delicate, pale green, papery cone full of perishable resins. They give beer bitterness when used early in the brewing process, and aroma when added at the end. As a bonus, hops are a preservative and extend the life of beer. Approximately 85% of hop material added to beer will become a by-product and require disposal. Spent hops have been trialled as a source of essential oils, which can act as an insect repellent, and compared with spent grain, spent hops have a higher fibre content. 

SPENT HOPS

Spent, verb [ spent ]
1. used up; consumed.

Hops or Humulus Lupulus 
1. a species of flowering plant in the hemp family 

Hop flower is the plant part used in brewing beer, a delicate, pale green, papery cone full of perishable resins. They give beer bitterness when used early in the brewing process, and aroma when added at the end. As a bonus, hops are a preservative and extend the life of beer. Approximately 85% of hop material added to beer will become a by-product and require disposal. Spent hops have been trialled as a source of essential oils, which can act as an insect repellent, and compared with spent grain, spent hops have a higher fibre content. 

SPENT HOPS

Spent, verb [ spent ]
1. used up; consumed.

Hops or Humulus Lupulus 
1. a species of flowering plant in the hemp family 

Hop flower is the plant part used in brewing beer, a delicate, pale green, papery cone full of perishable resins. They give beer bitterness when used early in the brewing process, and aroma when added at the end. As a bonus, hops are a preservative and extend the life of beer. Approximately 85% of hop material added to beer will become a by-product and require disposal. Spent hops have been trialled as a source of essential oils, which can act as an insect repellent, and compared with spent grain, spent hops have a higher fibre content. 

MATERIALS

MATERIALS

beer waste materials pivoflex

PIVO FLEX
Luna:lab developed a collection on flexible sheets that exhibit good elasticity and can be wrapped, twisted, folded and cut. The sheets are made using sediment, spent grains, natural plasticiser and an in-house developed natural binder. PIVO FLEX comes in various thicknesses and colours, which depends on the type of beer used to make it. PIVO FLEX is fully circular and can be either cold composted or used as a substrate to create new materials.

PIVO FLEX
Luna:lab developed a collection on flexible sheets that exhibit good elasticity and can be wrapped, twisted, folded and cut. The sheets are made using sediment, spent grains, natural plasticiser and an in-house developed natural binder. PIVO FLEX comes in various thicknesses and colours, which depends on the type of beer used to make it. PIVO FLEX is fully circular and can be either cold composted or used as a substrate to create new materials.

Photo 24-03-2020, 14 52 41

PIVO BOARD
PIVO BOARD is a range of hard sheets that come in either thin cardboard-like sheets or thick wood-particle-like boards. PIVO BOARD is made of a combination of spent grains, hops, sediment, our in-house developed bio-binder and natural resins. The surface can be left untreated with the grains creating a very tactile exterior or smoothed to reveal fibres and particles composing a pattern. PIVO BOARD is easy to work with and can be cut, sanded, glued, painted and lacquered. At the end of its life, the material should be cold composted or returned back to us to create new materials.

beer waste materials pivoother

PIVO OTHER
Our research and development work with the beer by-products continues and we are creating exciting new materials that include foams, films, extruded strands and moulding compounds to name a few. Watch this space!